Opening day: “In baseball, no other day is so pure with possibility.”

“No scores yet, no losses, no blame or disappointment. No hangover, at least until the game′s over.”—Mary Schmich

The heart of professional baseball, if not its roots, can be found in the Midwest, especially in Missouri, where the state has had a number of different major league teams, including  the Terriers of the Federal League, the Maroons of the National League, the  St. Louis Cardinals (originally the St. Louis Brown Stockings) and  the St. Louis Browns, the Kansas City Monarchs of the Negro Leagues, the Kansas City Athletics, and, finally, the Kansas City Royals, who, of course, won the World Series this past year. See how the great American pastime has played out in Missouri with this selection of books from our baseball collection:
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An excellent overview of the teams, pennant races, trials, and triumphs of the different major-league teams that have resided in Missouri over the years. Major-league baseball has a long and significant history in the state of Missouri, and Launius has done a superb job of telling its story.
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Richard Peterson 
Hardcover $34.95
The St. Louis Cardinals are the most successful franchise in National League history, while the St. Louis Browns were one of the most colorful American League teams. Now Richard Peterson has collected the writings of some of baseball’s greatest storytellers to pay tribute to both these teams. His book, the first anthology devoted exclusively to the Cardinals and Browns, covers the rich history of St. Louis baseball from its late-nineteenth-century origins to the modern era.
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Mark McGwire, Ozzie Smith, Lou Brock. These famous Cardinals are known by baseball fans around the world. But who and what were the predecessors of these modern-day players and their team? Jon David Cash examines the infancy of major-league baseball in St. Louis during the last quarter of the nineteenth century. His in-depth analysis begins with an exploration of the factors that motivated civic leaders to form the city’s first major-league ball club.
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Hardcover $34.95
1942: Americans suddenly found themselves at war but were not about to be distracted from the National Pastime. The Brooklyn Dodgers and New York Yankees were looking to continue their World Series rivalry from the 1941 season, and a youthful team from St. Louis was determined to stop them.
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Paperback $10.95

Heralded by local and national media as perhaps baseball’s most devoted followers, the lovers of St. Louis’s legendary Redbirds have a special bond with their team. This book celebrates this relationship by focusing on the people in the stands. A collection of essays gathered from around the world, from St. Louis to Hong Kong, Cardinal Memories forms a history of the team the way it is best remembered—through the eyes and hearts of its fans.

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Stuart L. Weiss
Hardcover $34.95
Curt Flood, former star center fielder for the St. Louis Cardinals, is a hero to many for selflessly sacrificing his career to challenge the legality of baseball’s reserve system. Although he lost his case before the Supreme Court, he has become for many a martyr in the eventually successful battle for free agency. Sportswriters and fans alike have helped to paint a picture of Flood as a larger-than-life figure, a portrait that, unhappily, may not be able to stand closer inspection. This book reveals the real Curt Flood—more man than myth.
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Hardcover $39.95
Paperback $24.95
In the most comprehensive assessment of baseball legend Stan Musial’s life and career to date, James N. Giglio places the St. Louis Cardinal star within the context of the times—the Great Depression and wartime and postwar America—and the issues then prevalent in professional baseball, particularly race and the changing economics of the game. Giglio illuminates how the times shaped Musial and delves further into his popular image as a warm, unfailingly gracious role model known for good sportsmanship and devotion to family.
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Paperback $19.95
During star-pitcher Bob Gibson’s most brilliant season, the turbulent summer of 1968, he started thirty-four games and pitched every inning in twenty-eight of them, shutting out the opponents in almost half of those complete games. After their record-breaking season, Gibson and his teammates were stunned to lose the 1968 World Series to the Detroit Tigers. For the next six years, as Gibson struggled to maintain his pitching excellence at the end of his career, changes in American culture ultimately changed the St. Louis Cardinals and the business and pastime of baseball itself.

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